Unpopular opinions about the Mario series

MnSG

Cosmic Beauty
Bandana Waddle Dee said:
ESRB confuses me sometimes. Like, Kirby's Return to Dream Land got slapped with an E10 despite other countries giving it an all-ages rating, while Kirby: Triple Deluxe gets away with an E despite there being two bosses that shed blood. Yikes.

Also, Brawl should have been rated E10 instead of T, Kirby 3 and 64 should have been rated E10 instead of E (Dream Collection was E10 because of them but the individual VC ones were still E). And I don't feel that Dream Team deserved E10 while Partners in Time gets away with E, despite the latter being a much darker game.

ESRB is messed up.
The E10+ rating for Return to Dream Land might have something to do with Magolor's second phase and Magolor Soul, but neither of them shed blood in any way. Brawl's Teen rating likely has to do with the game's more realistic approach, along with the crude humor involving Wario's Wario Waft, and Peach's underwear exposure.

In regards to the older games, E10+ never existed before Donkey Kong: Jungle Beat came to existence, so the way that the Everyone (K-A) and Teen ratings were handled can be questionable at times.
 

Princess Mario

✨Mushroom Kingdom's fabulously glittery plumber✨
Bandana Waddle Dee said:
ESRB confuses me sometimes. Like, Kirby's Return to Dream Land got slapped with an E10 despite other countries giving it an all-ages rating, while Kirby: Triple Deluxe gets away with an E despite there being two bosses that shed blood. Yikes.

Also, Brawl should have been rated E10 instead of T, Kirby 3 and 64 should have been rated E10 instead of E (Dream Collection was E10 because of them but the individual VC ones were still E). And I don't feel that Dream Team deserved E10 while Partners in Time gets away with E, despite the latter being a much darker game.

ESRB is messed up.
Well,you know, E and E10+ are as useful as G and PG ratings when it comes to measuring violence, as in, they're not useful at all (I read that study, some PG movies actually surpassed R movies in frequency of violent scenes, and bad language was a stronger factor than violence counts in several cases!)

The results of this study reflect the controversy surrounding the CARA rating system and demonstrate its failure to identify clearly violent content in American films. At first glance, it seems that the ratings system makes clearcut distinctions between PG-, PG-13–, and R-rated films with respect to violence, as R films contained more acts of violence than either PG or PG-13. These figures demonstrate that films with a more restrictive rating contained, on average, more violence as well as higher levels of seriousness. However, these basic distributions mask the inconsistencies in the application of its system. For instance, although the average number of violent bodily actions in a PG-13 film was 20, 6 PG films (20% of all PG films) exceeded the PG-13 average. In addition, 3 (10%) of the PG films had more acts of violence than the average for R films (32 per film). Such an overlap in the number of violent acts per rating proves that the ratings system is not consistent in its segmentation of categories. The most striking finding was that more than one quarter of the violence in each of the 3 rating categories was of lethal magnitude (highly serious). On the basis of this result, we believe that CARA has failed to adhere to its definitions of the PG and PG-13 ratings, which state, “horror and violence do not exceed moderate levels” and “rough or persistent violence is absent,” respectively.

In terms of the content descriptors, we found numerous glaring contradictions that were also identified in a recent study by Thompson and Yokota.14 For instance, when objectionable language was identified as the primary factor (which it most often was in PG and PG-13 films), violence levels were as high as those rated for violence. In addition, it was surprising to find that 5 PG films that were rated primarily for language had ≥14 violent acts. Likewise, in the R category, several films that were rated principally for language were saturated with violence. We understand this to mean that for the CARA rating board, transgressions of the norms governing speech decorum are more offensive than violence.
Sure, this is film content, but I don't think ESRB is that much better honestly.
 

Ribbon

Fairy of Ripple Star
Poll Committee
MnSG said:
Bandana Waddle Dee said:
ESRB confuses me sometimes. Like, Kirby's Return to Dream Land got slapped with an E10 despite other countries giving it an all-ages rating, while Kirby: Triple Deluxe gets away with an E despite there being two bosses that shed blood. Yikes.

Also, Brawl should have been rated E10 instead of T, Kirby 3 and 64 should have been rated E10 instead of E (Dream Collection was E10 because of them but the individual VC ones were still E). And I don't feel that Dream Team deserved E10 while Partners in Time gets away with E, despite the latter being a much darker game.

ESRB is messed up.
The E10+ rating for Return to Dream Land might have something to do with Magolor's second phase and Magolor Soul, but neither of them shed blood in any way. Brawl's Teen rating likely has to do with the game's more realistic approach, along with the crude humor involving Wario's Wario Waft, and Peach's underwear exposure.

In regards to the older games, E10+ never existed before Donkey Kong: Jungle Beat came to existence, so the way that the Everyone (K-A) and Teen ratings were handled can be questionable at times.
I mean, Kirby final bosses tend to be dark, and honestly, Magolor's about on par with Star Dream in terms of violence and darkness. If Return to Dream Land is E10 and Planet Robobot gets away with E, there's a problem. Triple Deluxe, I can see the reason for rating that E, as the blood is very mild and only shows up on postgame content, but the fact that ESRB didn't mention it at all is questionable.

As for older games, I know that E10 is relatively new. But those classic games were rated again for their VC versions, and kept the same rating as before instead of utilizing E10. Which is odd in the case of Kirby 3 and 64, because they were previously rated E10 as part of Dream Collection, but set back to E on VC, and I can't comprehend that when they have a significant amount of blood during their respective final bosses. E just doesn't feel right for them.

Princess Mario said:
Bandana Waddle Dee said:
ESRB confuses me sometimes. Like, Kirby's Return to Dream Land got slapped with an E10 despite other countries giving it an all-ages rating, while Kirby: Triple Deluxe gets away with an E despite there being two bosses that shed blood. Yikes.

Also, Brawl should have been rated E10 instead of T, Kirby 3 and 64 should have been rated E10 instead of E (Dream Collection was E10 because of them but the individual VC ones were still E). And I don't feel that Dream Team deserved E10 while Partners in Time gets away with E, despite the latter being a much darker game.

ESRB is messed up.
Well,you know, E and E10+ are as useful as G and PG ratings when it comes to measuring violence, as in, they're not useful at all (I read that study, some PG movies actually surpassed R movies in frequency of violent scenes, and bad language was a stronger factor than violence counts in several cases!)

The results of this study reflect the controversy surrounding the CARA rating system and demonstrate its failure to identify clearly violent content in American films. At first glance, it seems that the ratings system makes clearcut distinctions between PG-, PG-13–, and R-rated films with respect to violence, as R films contained more acts of violence than either PG or PG-13. These figures demonstrate that films with a more restrictive rating contained, on average, more violence as well as higher levels of seriousness. However, these basic distributions mask the inconsistencies in the application of its system. For instance, although the average number of violent bodily actions in a PG-13 film was 20, 6 PG films (20% of all PG films) exceeded the PG-13 average. In addition, 3 (10%) of the PG films had more acts of violence than the average for R films (32 per film). Such an overlap in the number of violent acts per rating proves that the ratings system is not consistent in its segmentation of categories. The most striking finding was that more than one quarter of the violence in each of the 3 rating categories was of lethal magnitude (highly serious). On the basis of this result, we believe that CARA has failed to adhere to its definitions of the PG and PG-13 ratings, which state, “horror and violence do not exceed moderate levels” and “rough or persistent violence is absent,” respectively.

In terms of the content descriptors, we found numerous glaring contradictions that were also identified in a recent study by Thompson and Yokota.14 For instance, when objectionable language was identified as the primary factor (which it most often was in PG and PG-13 films), violence levels were as high as those rated for violence. In addition, it was surprising to find that 5 PG films that were rated primarily for language had ≥14 violent acts. Likewise, in the R category, several films that were rated principally for language were saturated with violence. We understand this to mean that for the CARA rating board, transgressions of the norms governing speech decorum are more offensive than violence.
Sure, this is film content, but I don't think ESRB is that much better honestly.
Yeah, in terms of violence I always considered the E and E10 ratings largely the same, with the difference being some other factors. Like blood, or gore, or language, or other inappropriate content.

HEROWALUIGI said:
Bandana Waddle Dee said:
HEROWALUIGI said:
You have NOOO idea, lets just say they are the good guys.
I still don't understand your point. You telling me I'm wrong?
Watch Maybe skip a little but just look.
I'll probably watch that later. But I understand why the ESRB exists, and I'm not bashing it at all. It's just that their rating system isn't as accurate as it should be.
 

A Hungarian Goomba

Because "gomba" means "mushroom" in Hungarian
Wario Master of Disguise is a great game. It's one of those games that I have avoided for so long based on reviews and general opinion. When it's not ignored or forgotten (because let's face it, Wario platformers in general aren't that popular), it's frowned upon. Most complaints I've seen are about the difficulty (with a lot of puzzle-driven gameplay and exploration) and the dialogue-heavy story. By that logic, Hollow Knight would also be a bad game because it's very difficult, no? It's even more baffling since WMoD is a Metroidvania with intricate level design, so people who like to get lost exploring a level and solving puzzles shouldn't have a problem.

Another complaint I've seen is linked to the touch controls. I actually find it very interesting that you have to draw stuff on the screen to turn into something else, but honestly I can see that putting some people off.

My favorite part of the game, story-wise, is the conflict between Wario and Count Cannoli. As they race for the ultimate treasure, we can see how Wario outruns Cannoli to the point of frustration, and becomes so despondent that you actually feel sorry for the villain. You don't really see that in a Nintendo-published game.

And the game's portrayal of Wario is ideal. It's a combination of his macho personality seen in Wario Land and his sleazy fartbag personality from WarioWare. The game should bring peace between fans of both his sides.

The game does indeed feel experimental, that's why it was not developed by Nintendo themselves. No wonder Nintendo's own games feel so pussified when people actually despise the occasional challenging game they put out. Or IDK, maybe the game was easier for me to digest since I'm very familiar with the Wario Land series.

The opinion people have on the game (when they remember it) is honestly unfair. If you're a fan of Metroidvanias, and especially Wario Land 3, try Master of Disguise. It's a bliss.
 

Redshift

Enjoying dinners at 9:00 PM
the item descriptions in this game rock
 

Princess Mario

✨Mushroom Kingdom's fabulously glittery plumber✨
I played a bit of Super Mario Advance 2: Super Mario World. Solid game, but there are few things holding it back that I don't see it address all that often. Super Mario World and its remake get a ton of praise, never really see criticism aside from how easy it is from the Cape Mario and Blue Yoshi spam, but I myself have a few.

The timer gets in the way of a lot of what I need to do. I'm accustomed to clearing the level with all collectibles I can get before proceeding to the next. I also search for secret exist. The timer detracts from that experience of taking your time and exploring. Sure, the timer is a component of most Mario games, but Super Mario World has a few things that makes the timer all more obnoxious. The Dragon Coins have to be collected in a single playthrough of the level, so if you miss one, it's not considered cleared. This is unlike the New Super Mario Bros. games where you just need to find whatever is missing. Also, Super Mario World rewards you a lot for finding the right blocks to hit or playing smart with switches and then reaching a secret exit, moreso than the other platformers since you unlock a bevy of secret levels and even unlock an alternate path to Star World that lets you unlock Yoshi colors. The timer runs against the encouragement to explore, and it feels even more intrusive than in the other Mario platformers.

The remake does place more importance and meaning to collecting Dragon Coins, via a checklist menu and Princess Peach being pleased, but this comes with a drawback. Super Mario World has quite a few backtracking. The aforementioned problems with the Dragon Coins will have you replay levels multiple times, especially with the timer forcing you to clear the level or else get penalized and lose your powerup and progress (lives don't matter; they're mostly worthless). Some secret exits, if I recall correctly, might have been set in paths that have you miss out on some Dragon Coins, so you'll have to replay the levels. A lot of Dragon Coins and secret exists are also dependent on the switch palaces you will find later in the game, so this is inevitable backtracking if you want to clear the game, but it's pretty annoying. Luckily, the remake (which also added Dragon Coins to castles, ghost houses, and fortresses) has a neat level select menu where you can check which levels you cleared and have all the Dragon Coins (I'm not sure if the original has any indicator you collected all Dragon Coins). Oh, but since the remake added Dragon Coins to castles and fortresses, you can't revisit the castles and fortresses until you cleared the game, so that's annoying if you missed a Dragon Coin, especially after a checkpoint.

I also have an issue with the beanstalk, but I generally do with all other games with the beanstalk. They're the most easily missed secret of a level, and their implementation always feels cryptic and cheap. Super Mario World's implementation of beanstalk blocks seem a little more annoying than the experiences of beanstalks I had with New Super Mario Bros. Wii

That's all the major problems I have with the game, but one thing that annoys me to no end is reserve item mechanics. Mushrooms can spawn out of bushes and override your cape/fire flower reserve, and that's always annoying, but capes and fire flowers are extremely abundant. The remake is better than the original in practically all aspects, though. Voice acting, easier to get colored Yoshis rather than backtrack to Star World), reverting to Super rather than small if hit as Fire/Cape, more Dragon Coins, a new checklist menu that lets you warp to locations, more useful Yoshi egg-laying, and an intro cutscene.
 
I do NOT like the 3D World style controls in Mario Maker 2. I'd much rather have the original button-maps from from 3D World (ZL/ZR for Crouch, Crouch+Y for Roll, and Crouch+B for Long Jump).
 

Shy Guy on Wheels

Hornet from Daytona USA for Smash
Erdrick the Hero said:
I do NOT like the 3D World style controls in Mario Maker 2. I'd much rather have the original button-maps from from 3D World (ZL/ZR for Crouch, Crouch+Y for Roll, and Crouch+B for Long Jump).
thanks for reminding me that I'm the only person that use B to run and A to jump where possible.
 

Princess Mario

✨Mushroom Kingdom's fabulously glittery plumber✨
Nintendo has yet to figure out how to implement a way to remap controllers outside of Super Smash Bros.
 

Ribbon

Fairy of Ripple Star
Poll Committee
Moon Captain Mario said:
Mario 64 Sucks

Mario Land Is The Best

And That's Only TWO.
Mind elaborating on what you dislike about Mario 64, or what you like about Land?
 

Princess Mario

✨Mushroom Kingdom's fabulously glittery plumber✨
I know I'm late, but we can't have a discussion about shipping without the beautiful MSS Sea Star

 
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