4-year-old Texas girl taken from parents and heavily drugged by CPS

Quickie-la

Clusterfucked
In the case of little Rachel Harrison, her parents say a CPS-appointed physician filled out a Risperdal prescription for their daughter, but only after he met with the girl for 16 minutes. Dr. Osagie ignored attempts from Fox to comment on the issue, the station reports, which very well be because he is very busy — they network adds that he has so far treated 755 children in CPS foster care.
http://rt.com/usa/news/parents-child-daughter-rachel-619/


Pisses me off especially since I witnessed this jargon first-hand. Apparently the state pays the foster or group homes more when kids are "disabled", mentally or physically. Finally after leaving foster care at age 18, and after 9 months of physical therapy to self-ween off of medications, the Mental Health department of my county formally apologized for misdiagnosis and took me off of all of the Astra-Zeneca medications. These medications can have awful, life-long side effects, including bu not limited to diabetes. They can be especially harmful to patients whom are misdiagnosed with disorders like this young girl.

Discuss: Psychiatric medications, the benefits of the humanistic psychology vs. pharmaceutical psychology, experience, thoughts on this little girl, validity of this web source, etc.
 

Puddin

eat the rich
Dr. Javelin said:
What agency does CPS stand for?
"Child 'Protective' Services."

CPS is who takes children into custody when the parents are abusive... or that's what CPS is SUPPOSED to do. A lot of the time the kids are put into "placement" much worse than what they were taken from. (Source: I've personally witnessed this.)

This is disgusting. Her parents obviously shouldn't have been doing cocaine but there is no reason to put a four year old girl on this type of psych drug.

As far as validity of the news source goes, I doubt the mainstream media would cover this type of thing. With my own eyes I've seen children as young as 5 to 8 years old on anti-psychotics, so the idea of a four year old girl being put on them doesn't surprise me. (SADLY.)

What would have been called a temper tantrum years ago is now called a "psychotic outburst." Millions of children in this country are being drugged ("medicated") without good reason.

Choose to believe me or choose not to. All parents should beware, because it's getting easier and easier for CPS to take your children away.
 

Dr. Javelin

Nathan Latsk
Oh, okay.

Also, I'm not sure this story is legit, seeing as usually this would make the front page or at least an article on other news sites. And I haven't seen any evidence of that yet.

Sounds horrible though.
 

Mario4Ever

A price for everything.
Retired Wiki Staff
I'm skeptical of the entire diagnostic process and have been ever since hearing of David Rosenhan's experiment. For those not in the know, he and eight or nine others went into mental institutions claiming to hear voices that said "thud" or "empty" and were admitted, but they then acted sane (which I'm defining here as not having something listed in the DSM-IV). Their backgrounds were received as evidence of other conditions, such as parental detachment, and they were given medications and treatment that they did not need. The interesting thing about this is that the patients of the institutions who actually had some sort of disorder recognized these "pseudo-patients" as sane, whereas the staff either did as described above or neglected/abused them (at least one pseudo-patient had a log documenting his experiences, and that was received as OCD, I believe, and then another asked a staff member about being released, and the question was just ignored). In any case, the girl's experience, if true, should be (another) wake-up call about the reliability of not only diagnosis and corresponding treatment but also of labels in general.
 

Quickie-la

Clusterfucked
Mario4Ever said:
I'm skeptical of the entire diagnostic process and have been ever since hearing of David Rosenhan's experiment For those not in the know, he and eight or nine others went into mental institutions claiming to hear voices that said "thud" or "empty" and were admitted, but they then acted sane (which I'm defining here as not having something listed in the DSM-IV). Their backgrounds were received as evidence of other conditions, such as parental detachment, and they were given medications and treatment that they did not need. The interesting thing about this is that the patients of the institutions who actually had some sort of disorder recognized these "pseudo-patients" as sane, whereas the staff either did as described above or neglected/abused them (at least one pseudo-patient had a log documenting his experiences, and that was received as OCD, I believe, and then another asked a staff member about being released, and the question was just ignored). In any case, the girl's experience, if true, should be (another) wake-up call about the reliability of not only diagnosis and corresponding treatment but also of labels in general.

I agree with this, and thanks to Mason as well.
This definitely is an issue that needs to be addressed. The treatment in these mental health facilities is far from what they're made out to be (yes, I've been in them, during my stay in Foster Care. One time I was admitted for drawing something with blood in it.)

Whereas psychological illness can certainly be of genetic cause or birth defect; better methods of testing, beyond 'hearsay' (e.g. asking said 'delusional' patient "do you hear voices") should be put into development and required for psychotic diagnosis. An MRI or any test (other than urinalysis, aka pee test for drugs) isn't even a diagnostic requirement for schizophrenia.

I would guess that most diagnosis in the mental-health field today are misdiagnosed and mistreated. Drugs for depressive disorders seem to be thrown around like candy to patients who simply need to be heard by someone who actually will listen to their concerns.
And people who were called "socially awkward/nerds" 30 years ago are now called autistic. If Billy does square roots in his head but is too shy to talk, he's not mentally ill, he's just intelligent and has his mind on other subjects.

I would go on to address the sexual assaults on men, women, and children that mental hospital staff commit and get away with because the witnesses are "incompetent", but that's a whole other issue.
 
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